KIRK

I grew up in southwest Louisiana. Born into a creative family, my mother a high school art teacher, father a high school choral teacher and choral director at their church, and my sister a talented musician and visual artist. I attended Louisiana Tech University where I received a BFA in Photography and  sculpture. I nurtured my love of music as a disc jockey on the campus radio station. My medium of choice way back then was metal, making large steel sculptures. While I  mainly worked in steel, I really enjoyed the process of casting bronze and aluminum too. 

After graduation from college I became a DJ at an FM station in Lake Charles, LA. I decided to pick up a little more art experience, so I attended McNeese State University where I studied painting and ceramics. I met Lori in a painting class and was smitten. We were quickly engaged and married within the same year.

I spent much of my adult life working traditionally to help support my wife, and daughter Amber who is now an avid photographer. I worked for several years in television, which in part fulfilled my creativity. In Houston, Texas I worked as an award-winning producer/director for Houston public television (PBS). A few years later I went on to work in computer-based multi-media, computer-based training, and web development. Over the years I intermittently made time for creativity, doing steel sculptures, black and white photography, woodworking, and later digital photography producing high contrast black and white images.

Now living in Gilbert, AZ, I retired in 2012 to focus on art. I attended Arizona State University for a couple of semesters studying hand-built ceramics. Building a garage studio/workshop, I enjoy making hand-built ceramics, some of which are two dimensional pieces that Lori and I use in our collaborative work.

 

 

            

 

 

LORI

I was born in a small southern town in Louisiana. My father was a talented woodworker making custom doors, staircases, cabinets, and furniture. I would often watch my father in his workshop building functional pieces and sometimes gifts for others. Possibly influenced by my father’s creativity, I went to college and earned a bachelor’s degree in art. Similar to Kirk, I spent much of my adult life pursuing responsible careers, only intermittently cultivating my creativity, until recently.

My creative pursuits have always been small-format collages. I am fascinated with the process of bringing together handmade papers, assorted objects, and found items all with their own stories, and assembling them into an image reflective of past and present.

                       

 

   

 

     

Martha

Kirk and I have similar great childhood memories growing up together in a creative family. We learned to love music and visual art as well as nature and the great outdoors. We went to sleep at night listening to Vivaldi and Handel. 

   Our garage was always full to the brim with things that were being saved for possible future use. My mother never threw anything away. When I had a school construction project of some kind or an art assignment, I always knew I could find the right components hiding somewhere in that garage. I loved the hunt for the perfect specimen. 

    Music, dance, animals, and nature are all favorite subjects. I love making something from nothing. After teaching piano for 10 years and high school art for 22 years, I retired and have since enjoyed creating my own art. I still love the hunt! Most of my present work is mixed media sculpture constructed of found treasures, often including rusty metal gadgets that may have fallen from a truck bed, wood scraps or drift wood found on the beach, unrecognizable pieces of vehicles that have been run over multiple times in the road or strange gadgets picked up in my latest garden of delight... the local wrecked car parts yard... an oasis of rusty curiosities! 

    Famous artists that have influenced my work are Chuck Close (1940 to present) for his grid process and his huge portraits, the construction sculptor Louise Nevelson (1899-1988) who collected wooden trash and furniture parts thrown away on the streets of New York, and the Renaissance artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1526-1593) whose painted portraits are made up of various recognizable objects such as vegetables, tools, or other objects from his everyday life. 

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